What Does Your Shoe Say About You?

Daniel Gibbs, Posture Podiatry

Daniel Gibbs, Posture Podiatry

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thing we love to do as podiatrists is to look at the wear pattern on the base of your shoes.

One thing we love to do as podiatrists is to look at the wear pattern on the base of your shoes. A common problem we see is wearing down of the outside of the heel. Contrary to what people may think, this is not a sign that your feet are rolling in or out, but it is actually more to do with your hip position as your foot swings through from one step to the next. Another one is a circular wear pattern on one or both of your shoes under the forefoot. This is telling us that as you push off from one step to the next you may be twisting your foot slightly in order to clear the ground.  Take a look at the shoes you are wearing right now and see what areas are wearing down. By looking at your shoes, podiatrists can detect problems with hamstrings, Achilles tendons, big toes, knees, hips, back pain and even headaches. “Your shoes don’t lie!” The wear pattern on the base of your shoes can give podiatrists valuable clues as to how your posture is affecting your walking, and where there may be a loss of efficiency. “Try this out” A good thing to do at home is to line up three pairs of shoes, turn them over and study the wear pattern of the base of your shoes to see if there are any inconsistencies.  Do you notice that the wear pattern is the same from one shoe to the next, or does it change?  And of the shoes you have chosen, is the wear pattern different on the ones that are least comfortable? Do you notice that one shoe looks different to the other shoe? Even minor differences can be an indication of asymmetry, which could be contributing to pain or injury. If you do notice any of these, it may be worth investigating further. You may have just discovered the map that could lead you to the source of your pain.

Shoes can reveal a lot about your feet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A common problem we see is wearing down of the outside of the heel. Contrary to what people may think, this is not a sign that your feet are rolling in or out, but it is actually more to do with your hip position as your foot swings through from one step to the next.

Wearing down on the outside of the heels

Wearing down on the outside of the heels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another common problem is a circular wear pattern on one or both of your shoes under the forefoot. This is telling us that as you push off from one step to the next you may be twisting your foot slightly in order to clear the ground.

Take a look at the shoes you are wearing right now and see what areas are wearing down.

 

worn skate shoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By looking at your shoes, podiatrists can detect problems with hamstrings, Achilles tendons, big toes, knees, hips, back pain and even headaches.

 

Your shoes don’t lie!

The wear pattern on the base of your shoes can give podiatrists valuable clues as to how your posture is affecting your walking, and where there may be a loss of efficiency.

worn out thongs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Try this out

A good thing to do at home is to line up three pairs of shoes, turn them over and study the wear pattern of the base of your shoes to see if there are any inconsistencies.

Do you notice that the wear pattern is the same from one shoe to the next, or does it change?

And of the shoes you have chosen, is the wear pattern different on the ones that are least comfortable?

Do you notice that one shoe looks different to the other shoe? Even minor differences can be an indication of asymmetry, which could be contributing to pain or injury.

 

Wear Patterns on your shoes can reveal the true cause of your pain

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you do notice any of these, it may be worth investigating further. You may have just discovered the map that could lead you to the source of your pain.

 

 

The podiatrists at Posture Podiatry are trained to interpret the wear pattern on your shoes to find the best outcome for you.

 


 

 

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